John Green
John Green's cabin in 1893 (Source: Royal BC Museam, BC Archives)

John Green's cabin in 1893
(Source: Royal BC Museam, BC Archives)


(1817-1893) Also known as Jack Green, he was Savary Island's first non-native resident. He settled there in 1886, building a cabin, a store, and a small farm along the mainland side of what is now called Mace Point, but was then called Green's Point.

In 1893 Green and his business partner, Tom Taylor, were murdered during a robbery. The murderer, Hugh Lynn, was soon captured. He confessed and was hanged in 1894.

Green's cabin viewed from the East. According to Jim Spilsbury: "About 1932 the derelict cabin was considered a hazard and it was burned down."
(Source: Spilsbury's Album by Jim Spilsbury, Harbour Publishing, 1990, www.harbourpublishing.com)

Green's cabin viewed from the East. According to Jim Spilsbury:
"About 1932 the derelict cabin was considered a hazard and it was burned down."
(Source: Spilsbury's Album by Jim Spilsbury, Harbour Publishing, 1990, www.harbourpublishing.com)



RS Sherman on John Green


Here's Sherman's description of Green from his 1932 pamphlet The Ecology of Savary Island:

"When I first visited the island in 1892, its sole inhabitant was an old crippled man by the name of Jack Green. He lived in a cabin on the north shore, not far from Green's point, which appropriately bears his name.

Connected with the cabin was a log structure which he operated as a store and trading post. On the slopes contiguous to his house and store he had cut down the original forest of Douglas Fir and planted various crops between the huge stumps. He had a flock of some three hundred sheep, besides cattle, pigs and poultry.

Jack Green and a visitor to his ranch were murdered in 1893, as they sat at a game of cards."

Notes
1. A full and lively account of Green's murder and the investigation that followed can also be found in Sunny Sandy Savary (p38-52).

2. For years, rumour had it that Green had buried a strongbox containing all his money somewhere on the island. Chapter 5 of the book Lost Bonanzas of Western Canada, Volume 2 by Garnet Basque examines this rumour. It is entitled Old Man Green's Missing Hoard, and it give a very detailed account of Green's murder. Click here to read it.

3. There is also another lively account of the Green murder in Murder: Twelve True Stories of Homicide in Canada By Edward Butts. Click here to read it.

4. Click here to read the a description of Lynn's execution that appeared in the San Francisco Call on August 25, 1894.
Categories: people history



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