Anderson House
The Anderson house — the second house built on the island — is the island's oldest existing house. John Green's cabin preceded it.

The Anderson House in 1916 looking west. The Front Row before it was a row.  To its left is the Spilsbury family tent.  Today, Vancouver Boulevard runs left up the hill right where the Spilsbury tent used to be.
(Source: Spilsbury's Album by Jim Spilsbury, Harbour Publishing, 1990, www.harbourpublishing.com)

The Anderson House in 1916 looking west. The Front Row before it was a row. To its left is the Spilsbury family tent. Today, Vancouver Boulevard runs left up the hill right where the Spilsbury tent used to be.
(Source: Spilsbury's Album by Jim Spilsbury, Harbour Publishing, 1990, www.harbourpublishing.com)


Louis Anderson built it in 1905, and immediately moved there with his wife Lulu and their two young children (Andrew and Terry). In 1907 their daughter Sylvia was born, becoming the first caucasian born on Savary.
(Source: Kennedy, 1992, p54-55)

The Anderson House as of 2015

The Anderson House as of 2015


According to Stan Stewardson, in his essay 2012 Savary Island - A Personal Reflection: "The next permanent inhabitant of Savary Island was Louis Anderson in 1899. He bought a large portion of the Island for $1.00 an acre and in 1905 built the first house on Savary - which is presently owned by my brother-in-law. By 1910, there were 40 homes. ….

My brother-in-law’s place continues to this day [2012] to be a thorn amongst the roses. He refuses to have electricity, running water (a well) or modern conveniences. Though situated right on the beach (he bought it in 1961 for $3,500), it remains but a shell amid the growing mansions and is known to the residents as the 'ghost house'."
(Source: Savary Island - A Personal Reflection , Stan Stewardson (2012))

Notes
1. Directions: From the dock, turn right and then at the Y-junction instead of turning left up the hill, continue staight along Malaspina promenade. It is the second house on the left.
Categories: structures history



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